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January

The I-CAVE, short for Integrated Computer Augmented Virtual Environment, is a new facility composed of five 9-by-5 foot, high-resolution screens arranged in a hexagonal pattern. Visitors are given goggles and a remote control to navigate a virtual world. The first project to be featured is Shakespeare’s London circa 1598, which will kickoff a series of campus events celebrating the Folger Shakespeare Library’s national traveling exhibition First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare presented

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FIU President Mark B. Rosenberg has been named chair of a National Academies’ committee to develop benchmark and tracking tools for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

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Every two weeks, another language goes extinct. “It is estimated that within 100 years, the world could lose well over half of its current 6,000 languages,” said Phillip M. Carter, a linguistics professor in FIU’s Department of English. Carter is the author of Languages in the World: How History, Culture and Politics Shape Language, a newly published book that examines the world’s shrinking pool of languages.

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On Feb. 2, the FIU Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum will open its doors to William Shakespeare’s First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, a once-in-a-lifetime exhibit featuring a first edition of Shakespeare’s works. The rare book is considered to be one of the most significant in the English language.

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Join us for the 2016 Glaser Distinuguished Smeinar Speaker Series featuring Dr. James Elser from Arizona State University. Dr. Elser tests the theory of biological stoichiometry (the balance of elements in nature), spanning scales from organisms to ecosystems.

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Alexandria Pipitone, an English/marketing double major, spent the summer interning at Pearson, the world’s leading learning company.

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FIU biology student Sean Charles is examining how mangroves in the Florida Everglades are impacting the ecosystem around them as they gradually move inland from saltwater to freshwater communities.

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Mustafa Kamal Sikder wants more people to engage in Everglades restoration efforts. The FIU environmental studies student is examining Floridians’ opinions on the various benefits they currently enjoy from the River of Grass.

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February

Nearly 120 members of the community came together Feb. 8 for the Miami Heat’s 7th annual Heat Beach Sweep to paint and prepare protective sea turtle nesting sites along Crandon Park Beach in Key Biscayne, Fla.

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It’s not every day that FIU graduates’ jobs bring them from Washington, D.C., back to their alma mater. But for English alumna Cari Romeu ’07, bringing William Shakespeare’s First Folio to FIU during its national tour is just another day at the office.

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Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC) Director, Todd Crowl, is a co-founder of FIU’s Sea Level Solutions Center as well as founder and inaugural director of the Institute of Water & Environment. He was part of the annual TEDxFIU where he spoke about sea level rise and climate change.

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FIU presented “Zika Watch: What South Florida Needs to Know” The teach-in features several FIU experts across the sciences, medicine, public health and hospitality.The panelists discuss the biology of mosquitoes, transmission of Zika, trends in mosquito-borne illness, medical implications, travel concerns and more.

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March

Tropical species are especially vulnerable to climate change, according to FIU researchers. In an article published in Science, lead authors and biology Ph.D. students Timothy Perez and James Stroud explain how species found in environments such as the tropics have lower tolerances to climate change.

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Inaugural poet Richard Blanco ’91, MFA ’97, who presented his piece “One Today” at President Barack Obama’s second inauguration, was honored with the Distinguished Alumni Award from School of Environment, Arts and Society in the College of Arts, Science & Education.

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An aquatic ecologist, Todd Crowl is a co-founder of FIU’s Sea Level Solutions Center. He is also the director of the Southeast Environmental Research Center as well as founder and inaugural director of the Institute of Water & Environment. In his 2015 TEDxFIU talk, Crowl discusses how the next generation of scientists could find a solution to sea level rise.

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When geosciences professor Grenville Draper set out to find a way to better communicate with his colleagues in Latin America, he never imagined his efforts would result in the most downloaded paper on FIU Digital Commons. Draper, a British-born geologist, has spent much of his career studying plate tectonics in Jamaica, Hispaniola and the Caribbean... Continue reading here!

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The FIU Professional Science Master in Environmental Policy and Management (PSM-EPM) is training the next generation of professionals to protect, preserve and manage natural resources. Launched in fall 2014, the program focuses on areas including conservation biology, water resource management and public land management.

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Marine scientist devotes career to reversing trend of bycatch: Each time a commercial fisher casts a net, they run the risk of catching more than their intended targets. This is particularly true in small-scale and artisanal fisheries in Africa. It’s not unheard of to find manta ray and sea turtles among the netted fish headed for market. Dolphins too. In fact, the bycatch issue is the most serious problem facing marine mammals today, according to FIU marine scientist Jeremy Kiszka.

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FIU students are invited to attend a reception and advance screening of Sacha Baron Cohen’s latest film, The Brothers Grimsby, this Sunday, March 6. Students will be able to interact with Cohen and enjoy complimentary refreshments at a reception prior to the film screening. The screening will be followed by a Q&A session with Cohen who wrote, produced and stars in the action-comedy film.

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From hosting the book that gave us Shakespeare to winning a Conference USA championship, February was an action-packed month at FIU. Check out some of our favorite moments and images of the month, captured by FIU photographers.

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Many of you have expressed interest in a project that seeks to build two new recreation and practice fields for our students on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus. In a context of important multiple competing priorities, we are focused on making plans that address student needs and align with our broader commitment to environmental stewardship. 

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April

April is National Poetry month, and FIU News spoke to alumni who have broken into the ranks of published poets like Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello ’14, Ashley Jones ’15, Cathleen Chambless ’15, Rita Martinez ’03 and Alexandra Regalado ’99.

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Laurel Nakanishi, FIU MFA, is the creator of the Sun Room, a program going into Liberty City schools to teach creative writing to third- and fourth-graders. This room is where poetry becomes therapy.

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The North American Coastal Plain was recently declared a global diversity hotspot — one of the richest and most threatened reservoirs of plant and animal life on Earth.​ Evelyn Gaiser, executive director of the School of Environment, Arts and Society, offers perspective on the designation.

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his summer 1,000 African leaders and entrepreneurs will travel to the U.S. as part of the Department of State’s Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders (YALI). Twenty five of those will live at FIU for six weeks attending an academic and leadership institute focused on public management. This is the third cohort of African Leaders to visit FIU.

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A chemical used to disperse oil following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has been proven to severely harm and even kill jellyfish. A study by FIU’s Southeast Environmental Research Center found crude oil and weathered oil alone did not cause significant adverse effects in moon jellyfish, a species commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico where the spill occurred.

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Once a month, students from MAST@FIU gather along the shores of northern Biscayne Bay to study its fish populations. Under the guidance of MAST@FIU teacher Bridgette Gunn ‘12 and volunteers from SEAS, the high school sophomores and juniors utilize the living laboratory to gather original data on the environment as part of a long-term ecological monitoring project.

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Minnesota-native Laura Timm is exploring crustacean recovery in a post-oil spill environment.Laura Timm is taking a closer look at what life is like for nine species of crustaceans six years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.The FIU Ph.D. student and Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative scholar is exploring marine genetic diversity in Assistant Professor Heather Bracken-Grissom’s Crustacean Genomics and Systematics Lab.

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In a letter recently published in Science, researchers in the School of Environment, Arts and Society call for the consideration of cultural costs when building dams or developing sources of water power in the tropics.

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The world’s rarest species — both plants and animals — contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. An international team of researchers, including FIU botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are.

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FIU has launched the Institute of Water and Environment to address global water issues and broader challenges impacting the environment. It brings together some of the university’s top centers and programs to expand research and community engagement opportunities in the face of growing environmental threats.

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FIU marine scientist Heather Bracken-Grissom’s latest project is taking her to the depths of the ocean to further her research on bioluminescence in deep-sea shrimp.

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Learn more about SEAS Program Manager Stephany Alvarez-Ventura. She helps manage SEAS programmatic activities and outside partnerships.

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May

Conservation geneticist wants to arm Ethiopian and Indian farmers with revolutionary new varieties of chickpea. A team of researchers, including FIU biology professor Eric von Wettberg, has identified the gene responsible for giving white chickpea its light seed and flower color.

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Park on Blue Garage’s rooftop, and experience poetry. A gigantic poem written in between the lines of parked cars is the latest addition to the 2016 Honors College’s Aesthetics and Values exhibit currently on display at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum.

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In just five years, global learning has become an integral part of FIU, helping students gain a greater understanding of global issues and the collaborative spirit and perspective necessary to tackle complex problems. SEAS English and Earth and Environment departments made the list!

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The first captive-bred Florida Grasshopper Sparrow hatched this week under the care of researchers with FIU’s Tropical Conservation Institute. One of the world’s most endangered birds, the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow resides exclusively in Central Florida.

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Climate change, urbanization and growing populations can affect the survival of bears, jaguars, hyenas, lions, tigers and other of the world’s largest carnivores. This insight and more was presented by Joshua Ginsberg at this year’s Our Common Future lecture at FIU.

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Two FIU biology students were recently recognized by the Botanical Society of America as the country’s top, emerging botanists. Imeña Valdes and Rebecca Valls were among 27 students from the United States to receive the Young Botanist Award.

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Rebecca Rauch-Thane, a dual enrollment student at FIU from Miami Beach Senior High School, is on a mission to improve the health of Biscayne Bay. Northern Biscayne Bay has been affected by sewage release, bulkhead construction, dredging and the creation of artificial islands throughout the past century.

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The FIU Creative Writing Program and The Betsy-South Beach honored author Tim O’Brien with the 2016 Lawrence A. Sanders Award in Fiction during an award ceremony April 29. O'BrienO’Brien is a novelist best known for his work of fiction, The Things They Carried, a collection of semi-autobiographical short stories inspired by his experience in the Vietnam War.

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As we fast approach the close of another academic year, we are proud of our partnership between the Science Staff of the Everglades Foundation and the faculty and students of FIU. Together we continue to invest in the future of graduate students who are committed to Everglades restoration through science and research. Please enjoy this briefing on our FIU ForEverglades Student Scholars and Fellows and learn how together we can continue to educate the next generation of stewards.

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June

Researchers attempting the world’s largest-ever survey of shark populations have reached their first 100 reefs, collecting exciting footage along the way. Deploying baited remote underwater video (BRUV) equipment, researchers are catching the ocean’s top predators, including sharks and rays, on camera in their natural habitats.

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As a faculty and staff member at FIU, your gift to Ignite creativity, discovery and innovation demonstrates that we are united in a common goal: making FIU the best it can be, now and in the future. Faculty and Staff contributions do more than provide funds for programs and scholarships.

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Evelyn Gaiser can hear music in the cold and warmth from one of Florida’s oldest and deepest lakes. More than an aquatic ecologist, Gaiser is also a classically trained vocalist. She knows as much about music as she does about the diatoms under her microscope. For her, the artist and the scientist live in sync.

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FIU has some of the top marine researchers in the country, including several focused on the science of sharks. They are available for interviews in English, Spanish, French and Greek.

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From June 6-10, FIU inaugurated its dynamic new hub in the nation’s capital with a series of receptions with alumni, friends and federal partners. SEAS Director, Dr. Evelyn Gaiser was part of a panel discussion of how the preservation of the Everglades is deeply entwined in the well-being of the South Florida population, the prominence of Miami as a model for other coastal communities facing sea level rise, how FIU’s ecological research is relevant on a global scale.

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Biology student Emily Warschefsky is studying the genetic diversity in wild varieties of mango and how the crop has evolved over time through domestication. Warschefsky’s research will ultimately help breeders maximize positive genetic traits and produce mangoes that can tolerate harsh conditions and resist disease.

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The palette surgeonfish, or blue tang, is the star of Disney-Pixar’s latest film Finding Dory. FIU reef fish ecologist Alastair Harborne explains why blue tangs do not make good pets while offering alternatives for your family aquarium.

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As technology advances, research methodologies in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities are also shifting. A new resource at the FIU Libraries, the Digital Scholars Lab, aims to provide students and faculty with the necessary tools and training to analyze and create in a technology-driven era.

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StartUP FIU, an initiative aimed at supporting innovation among students, faculty, alumni and community members, encompasses three new incubators and an accelerator program that is accepting applications for the first cohort starting in September.

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Shark Week is approaching and FIU News is ready to talk predators. With some of the top marine researchers in the country, including several focused on the science of sharks, we have enough content to write about sharks for countless Shark Weeks. But we want to know what you want to know about sharks. Do you have a question about sharks? Ask.

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To help improve understanding of environmental contamination in water resources and design remediation strategies, FIU has launched the Center for Aquatic Chemistry and the Environment with a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology program.

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Jeremy Kiszka is advancing conservation efforts of sharks and rays in East Africa, an effort supported by the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. For Kiszka, an FIU marine scientist, it’s been a 15-year interest in a region where information is scarce.

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July

Matthew DeGennaro is determined to stop the world’s deadliest animal. The FIU biologist is the first scientist in the world to create a mutant mosquito — a feat he achieved in 2010 as a researcher at Rockefeller University in New York.

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Some fans are quiet, but weak. Others are powerful, but noisy. According to Dyson, their Air Multiplier fans are quiet and powerful. Perhaps that is why one of the world’s most endangered birds prefers a Dyson.

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A commemorative event at FIU marking International Mandela Day was hosted by a group of visiting scholars and professionals from across Africa. The event—held in the Graham Center Pit on July 18, Mandela’s birthday—aimed to raise awareness about the former South African president’s impact on the world and about the diversity of African cultures.

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FIU has teamed up with Broward College to share space and open doors to ever-greater numbers of students. Working side-by-side in a shiny office building, the college and university are serving young people at an outpost located off Interstate 75 in Broward County, about 30 miles north of the Modesto A. Maidique Campus.

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By 2050, there will be more plastic by weight than fish in the world’s oceans, according to researchers.This insight on ocean health and more was shared at the “Coral Reefs, Ocean Biodiversity and Climate Change” conference earlier this month featuring FIU marine scientists Jeremy Kiszka and Mike Heithaus.

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As part of the DEEPEND Consortium, FIU marine scientists Heather Bracken-Grissom and Kevin Boswell are working alongside more than 60 researchers from 16 institutions to understand the Gulf of Mexico and the impacts of the oil spill on the Gulf.

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A massive bloom of blue-green algae has hit four counties in Florida covering beaches along the Atlantic coast, damaging aquatic environments, impacting businesses and potentially causing health problems for the people and animals that come into contact with it. Governor Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency in Lee, Martin, Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties.

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FIU and Deering Estate have launched the FIU-Deering Cultural Ecological Field Station Fellowship Program to support graduate students whose dedicated research will benefit conservation management efforts at the estate, as well as broader conservation efforts in the region.

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A massive bloom of blue-green algae has hit four counties in Florida covering beaches along the Atlantic coast with foul-smelling, thick muck. Discharge from Lake Okeechobee is to blame for the toxic blooms that are ruining aquatic environments, devastating businesses and potentially causing health problems for the people and animals who come in contact with it.

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In the weeks following the shootings at a gay nightclub in Orlando that killed 49 people, the nation has rallied to help families of the victims cope with loss and push for an end to hatred. FIU creative writing alumnus Richard Blanco ’91, MFA ’97, penned an emotional response to the devastation titled “One Pulse—One Poem” for the Miami Herald.

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While Shark Week often delves into the sensational aspects of sharks, FIU’s biologists are quick to remind people that sharks aren’t exactly the voracious predators we often fear. In fact, shark attacks on humans are rare.

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Sharks and dolphins have shared the ocean for ages, but only recently, scientists have begun to understand the true nature of the relationship between these two masters of the sea. It’s dangerous for dolphins, but sometimes the tables are turned. Aired during Shark Week 2016, Sharks vs. Dolphins: Face Off uncovers the mysteries of the relationship.

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Growing to nearly 15 feet in length, the American alligator can take up residence in Florida’s canals, lakes, rivers and swamps. It is one of the state’s most ecologically important and often misunderstood predators. And when they attack, they make news.

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As part of the DEEPEND Consortium, FIU marine scientists Heather Bracken-Grissom and Kevin Boswell are working alongside more than 60 researchers from 16 institutions to understand the Gulf of Mexico and the impacts of the oil spill on the Gulf.

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Substantial changes are in the works for shark conservation after decades of neglect. The current state of shark populations is very poor, according to FIU marine biologist Demian Chapman, and much work remains to reverse that trend.

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August

September 16 is National Collect Rocks Day, so FIU News reached out to faculty members in the Department of Earth and Environment to learn about the rocks that set their careers in motion.

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Phillip M. Carter wrote an op-ed was for the Miami Herald Thurs., July 28. Phillip M. Carter is a professor of linguistics in the FIU Department of English. Carter has conducted research on bilingualism and Hispanic-English dialects in the United States, particularly in Texas, North Carolina and Florida.

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Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and FIU have established a new partnership that will serve FIU students as well as citizens of Collier County and surrounding areas.

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Florida’s lobster season kicks off Aug. 6 and, once again, commercial fisheries are trying to get their hands on these savory critters. FIU marine scientist Heather Bracken-Grissom offers insight on one of the state’s most iconic and economically lucrative marine animals.

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September

n FIU student was chosen as one of 16 undergraduates across the nation to receive a scholarship from the National Institutes of Health, which includes a one-year, paid research position at its lab in Bethesda, Md., after graduation. The recipient, senior biology major Brian Ho, has a resume that fits the bill of a national scholarship awardee.

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In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. SEAS Executive Director, Dr. Evelyn Gaiser, is among the eight speakers chosen for the upcoming fifth annual event.

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Protected areas can stop people from cutting and burning trees in the Amazon, but they can’t keep rising temperatures out. In a recent study, FIU biologist and a researcher with the International Center for Tropical Botany (ICTB) at the Kampong Kenneth Feeley found that in as little as 35 years at least 19 percent and as many as 67 percent of the Amazon’s protected areas will not have the same temperatures or climates found today.

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Biologist Matthew DeGennaro conducts research on mosquito behavior with FIU’s Biomolecular Sciences Institute. He hopes to uncover information that will someday lead to better repellents. As the number of confirmed Zika virus cases is on the rise in Miami Beach, he says the time has come to stop spraying.

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Sea level rise is as much a political issue as a scientific one. Philip Stoddard understands this well. He is both an FIU biologist and mayor of South Miami. For his work on issues related to sea level rise, he can also now add a member of Politico 50 to his list of titles.

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After analyzing data from rocks, fossils and genetic studies, a team of international researchers found the land bridge, known as the Isthmus of Panama, formed 2.8 million years ago. FIU geologist and paleontologist Laurel S. Collins is one of the 35 researchers who authored the study.

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This article is part of our Summer Sojourns 2016 series highlighting the summer adventures of FIU students. Earlier this summer, students in Beta Beta Beta (part of the National Biological Honors Society) and student volunteers from the Miami Medical Team (a non-profit organization that aides third-world countries’ health and sanitation) went on a mission trip to New Orleans to help senior citizens, children and the homeless.

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October

In an effort to understand the diets of plant-loving fish, FIU Ph.D. student Jessica Sanchez and marine sciences professor Joel Trexler delved into the world of herbivory in freshwater ecosystems. Their efforts resulted in a scientific paper that was published in a recent issue of Ecosphere. It was the 800th scientific paper published by research faculty in FIU’s SERC.

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When’s the last time you drew something? Drawing assistant professor Michael Namkung says drawing can help us understand the most difficult of subjects. Namkung has launched a website to show how important drawing is in the lives of everyday people. Geology professor Grenville Draper will show how he uses drawings routinely in his research and teaching.

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Four FIU students will have the chance to participate in a groundbreaking research and education expedition into the Arctic’s Northwest Passage in the summer of 2017. Students selected for the mission, which will include three FIU undergraduate students and one graduate student, will serve as part of the crew and participate in the filming of a documentary. They will work alongside a team of ocean scientists, historians, and Arctic naturalists.

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It has been six years since the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill dumped millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Plants and animals were harmed and the places they call home destroyed. Researchers at FIU’s School of Environment, Arts and Society have been focused on uncovering the far-reaching environmental damage done to the Gulf of Mexico from the oil spill.

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Punctuation. It’s a little thing that can make the difference between inviting grandma to supper and a homicide conviction. Punctuation is nothing more than little marks that provide clarity to the written language. Without it, sentences would have no beginning or end. Every year, punctuation is celebrated on National Punctuation Day in September.

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November

The International Long Term Ecological Research Network is made up of scientists working to improve what is known about different ecosystems throughout the world and how these ecosystems are changing. This includes the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) program, which is based at FIU.

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December

This holiday season gives us a brief moment upon which to reflect, appreciate and celebrate all our many blessings and of course to plan for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

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The creators of Yonanas have just released their latest invention, and it’s perfect for those wanting to get moving on their New Year’s Day resolutions. Invented by FIU alumni Brian Machovina and Eileen McHale, COREYAK is a home fitness machine that mimics kayaking and rowing.

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Charles Dickens self-published A Christmas Carol in 1843 in a desperate attempt to save his struggling writing career. The book not only turned him into a literary sensation but also revived the spirit of Christmas, helping to bring back the nostalgia and tradition that is still celebrated today.

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With final exams, work and family commitments piling up this month, chances are you might have put off your holiday shopping. But, don’t panic! If you’re in need of the perfect stocking stuffer or that Hanukkah gift for the eighth night, FIU Creative Writing Program Director Les Standiford believes giving a book as a gift is a special sign of recognition between the giver and the recipient.

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Lizards are on the loose in South Florida and FIU biologist James Stroud needs local middle schoolers to help him keep track of the reptiles. Stroud is training middle school students to collect information on anole lizards, including species, size and where they are found. To help the young ecologists, he has created a Field Identification Guide for the Anole Lizards of Miami and an established protocol for how to collect project data.

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Don’t be afraid to apply and don’t count anything out. An experience is just that, an experience, so to be involved in something that you weren’t sure of may surprise you in the end. Take all of the chances, because now is the time.

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When it comes to storing carbon, scientists have put a price tag on the value of mangroves in Everglades National Park and it’s in the billions. Based on a scientific cost estimate, the stored carbon is worth between $2 billion and $3.4 billion, the researchers found.

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Decorating for the holidays? Need a host gift for a party? Consider giving back to FIU at the same time by purchasing a poinsettia grown by agroecology students!

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Biology is the study of living organisms. It’s all about life! That’s the point the biological honor society Beta Beta Beta (Tri-Beta) is setting out to make – the biological sciences is more than just science it is about people.

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In response to months-long protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline project in North Dakota, the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs and its Global Indigenous Forum hosted a discussion between faculty experts in water security and native rights and local members of the Seminole nation.

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Sea level rise is a monumental threat, but one FIU biologist is tracking levels using one of the Florida Everglades’ tiniest residents. Viviana Mazzei is examining communities of algae to help resource managers pinpoint which areas need freshwater most.

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Alligators are one of the Florida Everglades’ most famous predators. They sit at the top of the food chain and influence the world around them by how they hunt and what they eat. But FIU biologist Bradley Strickland believes they also impact the ecosystem from the bottom of the food chain up.

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Kathy Quardokus Fisher was finishing her post-doc studies at Oregon State University in readiness for a move to FIU, where she had accepted an assistant professorship in the Department of Earth and Environment. Shortly before she and her husband embarked upon their cross-country trek to Miami, she received an email from her soon-to-be boss. Chair René Price was encouraging her to join FIU’s Faculty Mentoring Program (FMP), a voluntary program for junior faculty members.

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Two cold spells, two years apart, in two subtropical regions of the world have given scientists clues to what happens when an extreme climate event strikes. “Long-term ecological studies like these give us opportunities to understand complex consequences of unanticipated events such as extreme cold snaps,” said Evelyn Gaiser, FIU professor of biology and lead principal investigator of the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Everglades Research (FCE LTER) Program.

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Bottlenose dolphins in the Florida Coastal Everglades have higher concentrations of mercury than any other populations in the world. FIU scientists examined dolphins from the lower Florida Keys, Everglades National Park and Florida Bay, looking for mercury and organic pollutants in their skin and blubber.

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Annette Dominguez is a Sustainability Major with a certificate in Public Policy at FIU. She interened at blueEnergy – an international organization dedicated to sustainable solutions to complex challenges in Bluefields, Nicaragua – for 4 weeks

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